Gustavo Pazos Conde

A review of Caraguatá – the CD presentation of Gustavo Pazos Conde at the Tropentheater, Amsterdam, the 2nd of December 2012.

He stringed melancholy that day, in chords unstruck like the words upon his lips
It was the sound of remembrance, of a conquered past
Filling the space of the place where he boldly sang a song,
Where he dreamed, provoked, presented himself as a fait accompli
In pursuit of his life while he picked up its pieces,
And strummed his guitar –some thirty years ago

He sang again that day, pensively, that song; he, not a singer
But rather one whose soul yields in sensing fingertips
Playing out his passion to the attentive people present,
Honouring who listened in that darkening afternoon
– Once hiding in the wombs of the country’s finest venues,
Programming and staging whose music touched his heart

Now hearts were touched by him, whose head had long grown weary
Of the ever-pending conflicts, and never-ending fights,
Dispatching man from virtue, from childhood dreams, and rights
At the stage of revolutions in worlds confined to fright
– The longing for reunion with what defies the reason
Sonorously surrounding the programme he compiled

For hear! Diversity seemed long his heartfelt ember trademark,
When he roamed the world of music for authenticity at play
Inspired by profoundness, and the beauty of the truthful
His own style double-branded by the gauchos of the pampas
Where chamarritas chase the grace of milongas in their sway,
And estilos serve to charm the Rio’s pour at bay

– Gustavo Pazos Conde, bringing us refinement from his native Uruguay.
Review by Aya J.D. Dürst Britt of Caraguatá; CD presentation of Gustavo Pazos Conde at the Tropentheater, Amsterdam, the 2nd of December 2012.

Zakir Hussain & Masters of Percussion

The 2nd of November 2012 marked a special date: the “Masters of Percussion” concert featuring Zakir Hussain on tabla, Dilshad Khan on sarangi, Niladri Kumar on sitar,  Sridar Parthasarathy on mridangam, and T.H.V. Umashankar on gatham at the Dutch Tropentheater, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

 

Out of the Ocean’s deep waters of joy
Developed a stillness enfolding the soul
Born out of silence, transforming by sound
She flows like the rivers when rainfall abounds.

So fertile her nature; her bosom so sweet
Gracefulness blessing who touches her feet
Her beauty leaves spellbound, her music enchants
The chimes at her ankles evoking a trance

Hail Sarasvati, you mistress of tune!
Worshipped for ages through heat and monsoon
You’ve granted us music, enticed us in art
Inspired creation, provide it, in part

It happened one evening, one magical night
While moon started waning, and stars were alight
That people came over from far and away
To witness a concert of spirited play

The taal of the tabla, the ghatam, mridangam
Inviting, responding, conspiring as one
Alluring each other to miss out just some
Sarangi and sitar encircling their sam

Ustad Allarakha, your soul rests in peace!
Your guidance ignited what you have achieved
The humblest of many, a son of your breed
A student-like Master whose hands reign in beat

So fragile his stature; so awesome his might
Unequalled in legend, in stories so bright
From dhati‘s to dhins, and tins, at their height
Exceeding the speed of the bumble bee’s flight

Enthralled and amazed by that wonderful sight
We witnessed with earfuls a union of minds
Each of these musicians a treasure of kind
Their ragas a beacon of musical light

They’re blessed to their blood, pulsating inside;

True sons of Sarasvati.

Bickram Ghosh

The 31st of July 2012 I was lucky enough to attend two very inspiring performances at the Gandhi Centre, The Hague, The Netherlands, as organised by Her Excellency Ambassador Bhaswati Mukherjee:  “Legacy of Rhythm”, featuring the acknowledged Indian musicians Pandit Shankar Ghosh and his son Bickram Ghosh on tabla, Ilyas Khan on sarangi, and  “Melting Pot”, featuring Bickram Ghosh on tabla, jazz musician Matthias Müller on guitar, and the talented Arun Kumar on drums.

 

“Legacy of Rhythm”

 

Last night I witnessed Grace, attuned to pace, unfolding

A radiant face of bonding –the mutual respect

Of a father and a son, to mastership reborn

Interplaying passion to the sarangi’s winding stream

Dedicating heart beats to their tablas’ sound, supreme.

 

Such vigour at display, such brilliant, skilful language!

Never have I noticed musicianship like this

Communicating age old yet timeless rhythmic patterns

In whispers of a breeze, and raging thunder storms alike

Melodies meandering, overflowing with delight..

 

The audience? Exalted, enticed by masters’ strike.

 

 

“Melting Pot”

 

Who could have guessed, that evening, that sound would change her dress

Transforming into fusion while previously pressed

In an admiring classic outfit, then suddenly expressed

By loose, explicit garments, fiery but profound

The audience’s ears both astounded and refreshed.

 

Oh! What inspiring joy to attend this spicy venture

Inviting one to stretch and leave one’s comfort zone

As Matthias’s guitar sang hauntingly of kindness

Electric pulse ignited from Bickram’s tapped chest

Accompanied in virtue by Arun’s grounding test..

 

Lord Shiva danced to fireworks? Our souls rejoiced at best.

 

 

Said Hafiz

Said Hafiz was te zien op donderdag 17 januari 2008 in Theater De Regentes te Den Haag, vrijdag 18 januari 2008 in de Geertekerk te Utrecht, en zaterdag 19 januari 2008 in Podium Mozaïek te Amsterdam. Line-up: Said Hafiz (zang), Said al-Sayad op`ud (luit), Mahmud al-Sayad op kawala (kleine Egyptische bamboefluit) en Hassan Ghaydan op tabla. In 2008 richtte ik mij in mijn studie Islamic Studies nog op de status van soefizangers in Egypte; later veranderde dat (zie ‘About’).

Over Said Hafiz

Said Hafiz is de artiestennaam van de blinde shaykh Said Hassan Hafiz Idris. Said Hafid werd in 1951 geboren in Ismailiya, een havenstad in het noordoosten van Egypte.

Door zijn blindheid maakte de jonge Said de keus om na het jarenlang volgen van lessen op koranscholen te gaan studeren aan de al-Azhar universiteit te Cairo. Daar legde hij zich toe op het leren zingen van inshad dini, ofwel religieuze liederen, en de tajwid, het reciteren van de Koran. Na het doorlopen van zijn opleiding aan de Azhar verwierf hij de titel shaykh. Hierna studeerde hij muziek bij  de vooraanstaande Egyptische componist Ahmed Abd-el-Qader (o. 1984), een beroemde zanger en componist van seculiere muziek. Zo vreemd als deze overstap op het eerste gezicht mag lijken, zo vanzelfsprekend was deze voor Said Hafid, als men bedenkt dat er binnen de seculiere muziek gebruik wordt gemaakt van dezelfde maqamat, muzikale modi, als binnen de religieuze muziek.

In 1973 begon Said Hafizs’ professionele carrière en werd hij erkend als munshid, zanger van religieuze liederen. Hij zong in diverse religieuze programma’s op radio en tv. In 1979 draaide men zijn lied “Hamdulillah” (“God zij dank”) op de nationale radio, en vanaf dat moment zou men ook Koranrecitaties van zijn hand gaan uitzenden. Ook presenteerde hij religieuze en mystieke gezangen tijdens soefibijeenkomsten in de Sayyidna al-Husayn moskee en de Sayyidana Zaynab moskee in Cairo. Hechte contacten met de populaire Egyptische zangers en componisten Mohammed Lahlu (“Ya habibi, kan zaman”) en Imam al-Bahr Darunish (“Ya rasul Allah, ya habib Allah ”) zouden Said Hafiz niet alleen in Egypte grote bekendheid geven, maar ook in de rest van de Arabische wereld.

In 2002 werd hij voor het eerst uitgenodigd om het daaropvolgende jaar op te treden tijdens het prestigieuze Fès Festival musiques sacrées du monde, waar Said Hafiz inmiddels zes keer zijn medewerking aan verleende. Twee keer trad hij op in Tunesië; één keer in Frankrijk; één keer in Barcelona en Girona in Spanje; en nu voor het eerst in ons land, in Den Haag, Utrecht en Amsterdam.

De Spaanse journalist Marino Rodriguez schreef in 2005 in het magazine La Vanguerdia over Said Hafiz het volgende: ‘De blinde zanger Said Hafiz, een verbluffende mengeling van de swing, inspiratie en fysieke presentatie van Ray Charles, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan en Luciano Pavarotti, geeft een wonderbaarlijke uitvoering van Egyptische religieuze liederen.’

Mijn interview met Said Hafiz is gebaseerd op de gesprekken die ik met hem had op vrijdag 18 januari 2008 in de Geertekerk te Utrecht en op zaterdag 19 januari 2008 in Podium Mozaïek te Amsterdam, voorafgaande aan zijn optredens. Donderdag 17 januari 2008 heb ik zijn optreden in Theater Zwembad De Regentes te Den Haag bijgewoond, evenals op vrijdag 18 januari in de Geertekerk te Utrecht. De dag van zijn vertrek naar Egypte, zondag 20 januari 2008, heb ik hem en zijn muzikanten nog op Schiphol ontmoet, en daar afscheid van hen genomen. Het interview kwam tot stand met behulp van Gustavo Pazos Conde (voormalig NPS producer en programmeur), Yoessef Ghazi (Said Hafizs’ impressario) en Hatim Suleiman (medewerker Concertzender).

Interview met Said Hafiz

In het kader van mijn afstudeeronderzoek binnen de master Islamic Studies hou ik mij bezig met de relatie tussen de orthodoxe islam en het soefisme in Egypte, en het effect van deze relatie op de  het werk van de munshidin van mystieke inshad dini, zoals shaykh Ahmed al-Tuni en shaykh Yasin al-Tuhaymi. Ziet u door uw eigen werk als munshid verschil en/of spanningen tussen moslims die een strenge, orthodoxe islam aanhangen en moslims die een meer mystieke benadering van de islam volgen, zoals de soefi’s?

‘Je hebt vrome soennitische moslims met een lange baard die als ze gaan trouwen ervoor kiezen om een munshid uit te nodigen om religieuze liederen ten gehore te brengen. Die munshid wordt dan echter alleen begeleid door vier à vijf muzikanten die de daff (ook wel duff of riqq genoemd) gebruiken, een tamboerijn met vijf schellen. Dat instrument was namelijk al in de tijd van de Profeet Mohammed in gebruik, en is daardoor in de visie van orthodoxe moslims toegestaan. Andere Egyptenaren willen op hun trouwfeest echter populaire muziek horen, variërend van klassiekers van Umm Kulthum en Abd-el-Halim Hafiz tot de liedjes van moderne zangers en zangeressen. Dergelijke muziek is dan goed voor het gemoed en de sfeer, en het draagt bij aan het ervaren van welzijn bij de toehoorders. Daarbij versterkt de muziek de stem van degene die zingt.

In mijn werk richt ik me op het zingen van religieuze liederen pur sang, niet op religieuze liederen met een mystieke ondertoon -zoals wel het geval is bij een munshid die een soefi-orde vertegenwoordigt. Ik woon dan ook niet uit persoonlijke motieven de bijeenkomsten van soefi’s bij, of dat nou een hadra is of een layla viering (respectievelijk een frequente bijeenkomst en een bijeenkomst laat op de avond). Eerder noemde je shaykh Ahmed al-Tuni en shaykh Yasin al-Tuhaymi; ik ken hen niet, al zullen veel mensen die zich bezighouden met het soefisme hen wel kennen.’

(Op dat moment hoor ik kawala-speler Mahmud al-Sayad zeggen dat hij in het verleden heeft samen gewerkt met Ahmed al-Tuni.)

‘Ah, Mahmud zegt dat hij vroeger in het ensemble van shaykh Ahmed al-Tuni heeft gespeeld. Hij kent hem dus wel. Overigens, in mijn ogen is driekwart van de Egyptische bevolking niet bezig met religieuze dogma’s. Ik beschouw de islam niet als een dogma; iedereen heeft zijn of haar eigen band met God. Het belangrijkste is dat de islam mensen ‘goed’ maakt, en correct in hun handelingen.’

Zingt u ook andere genres dan de inshad dini?

‘Jazeker. Ik zing ook graag liedjes van Umm Kulthum en AbdelHalim Hafez, bepaalde poëzie, en nummers geschreven door bijvoorbeeld de bekende dichter Ahmed Shawqi en Imam al-Busari. Wat ik op de radio en op de televisie zing wordt echter vooraf inhoudelijk gekeurd, dat is puur religieus. Maar thuis heb ik op mijn computer een hele bibliotheek aan populaire muziek, traditionele muziek, klassieke muziek, en religieuze muziek, onder andere van het madih genre, waarin over God of de Profeet gezongen wordt. Daar geniet ik echt van.’ (In de madih van soefizangers worden overigens ook soefiheiligen lof bezongen.)

Tijdens uw drie concerten hier in Nederland wordt u aangekondigd als zanger van spirituele muziek, van mystieke liederen, alsof u een soefizanger bent. Ik begrijp uit uw eerdere woorden dat u juist niet persoonlijk of als zanger verbonden bent aan een soefi-orde, en dat wat u zingt eigenlijk niet zozeer spiritueel of mystiek van aard is. Hoe vindt u het dat u op andere wijze wordt gepresenteerd?

‘O, is dat zo? (Lacht) Ach, ik zing hier in Nederland niet echt religieuze nummers, omdat ik denk dat het Europese publiek daar niet op zit te wachten.’

Wat zingt u dan wel tijdens uw concerten hier?

‘Nou, wat ik hier zing heeft op zich wel een religieuze ondertoon hoor. Ik dacht alleen dat een christelijk publiek niet in islamitische religieuze muziek geïnteresseerd is. Daarom zing ik wat toegankelijker liedjes.’

(Later begrijp ik dat de shaykh, zoals ik al vermoedde, daadwerkelijk een nummer van Umm Kulthum heeft gezongen, “Al-qalb yi’ashaq kullu gamil”, oftewel “The heart loves all that is beautiful”, waarbij in de context van shaykh Said Hafids zang God wordt bedoeld met “kullu gamil”. De tekst, religieus getint en met een licht mystieke ondertoon, is van de grote Egyptische dichter Bayram al-Tunsi (1893-1961) en de muziek is van de hand van Riyad al-Sunbati. Dit werd mij verteld door de van oorsprong Egyptische Hatim Suleiman (actief voor o.a. het radioprogramma Orient Express van de Concertzender), die bij de concerten in Utrecht en Amsterdam aanwezig was. Hij zei verder dat de shaykh tijdens elk concert in Nederland ongeveer 2 religieuze liederen zong op een totaal van ongeveer zes, waarbij alleen het eerste lied uit het genre van de inshad dini afkomstig was.)

Voor zover ik het kan inschatten trekt u in Nederland juist een zeer gevarieerd publiek: van moslims tot christenen, en van mensen met een algemene interesse in het Midden-Oosten tot nieuwsgierige niet-gelovigen. Zij komen juist speciaal voor u omdat zij denken dat u een soefizanger bent en mystieke liederen zingt.

‘Het verbaast mij wel dat mensen hier daarin geïnteresseerd zijn. Dat had ik niet gedacht. In mijn visie zijn de munshidin die gerelateerd zijn aan soefi-ordes minder professioneel en capabel, maar dat komt omdat zij vaak geen professionele opleiding tot zanger van dat soort muziek hebben gehad. Daarom beschouw ik wat ik doe als beter en meer verantwoord, in artistiek opzicht. Ook ben ik van mening dat er een groot verschil bestaat tussen religieuze muziek zoals ik die uitvoer, en de spirituele of mystiek-religieuze muziek die door soefizangers wordt uitgevoerd. Het is gewoon anders van aard.’

U gaf aan dat u niet uit persoonlijke overwegingen een hadra of een layla viering van een soefi-orde zou bijwonen. Bent u wel geneigd om met uw ensemble op te treden tijdens dergelijke bijeenkomsten?

‘O ja, jazeker, dat doe ik wel. Bij belangrijke mawalid (meervoud van mawlid, mulid in het Egyptisch-Arabisch) ben ik wel eens aanwezig om op te treden, bijvoorbeeld in de moskee van Sayyidana Nafissa en de moskee van Sayyidna al-Husayn. Ik zing heel af en toe wel eens soefimuziek hoor.’ (Hij zet daarop een typisch soefilied in, waarop zijn muzikanten hem stemmig bijvallen.)

Wordt er ook speciaal voor u gecomponeerd?

‘Ik heb het geluk gehad al vroeg te mogen werken met de Egyptenaren Mohammed Lahlu en Imam al-Bahr Darunish, allebei bekend en gerenommeerd zanger en componist. Ik zing ook liedjes van hen. Weet je wel dat ik meer dan 250 nummers heb opgenomen?’

Nee, dat wist ik niet. Wil dat zeggen dat uw muziek in Egypte massaal op bandjes en cd’s te koop is? Enkele bezoekers van uw concerten in Den Haag en Utrecht hadden namelijk graag een cd of een bandje van uw muziek willen kopen, maar dat was niet mogelijk.

‘Nou, er is wel muziek van mij te koop in Egypte, maar niet massaal. Het produceren is op zich niet zo kostbaar, maar voor religieuze muziek is er gewoon geen grote markt. Populaire muziek heeft veel meer aftrek. Overigens, mijn muziek wordt veel gedraaid op een Egyptisch radiostation voor zang gebaseerd op de Koran: Idha‛at al-Qur’an al-karim. Veel van wat ik heb opgenomen wordt daar gedraaid, dat zijn ibtihal (dit is een genre religieuze zang waarin een smeekbede of lovend gebed centraal staat). Zo’n acht keer per maand doe ik ook de adhan van salat al-fajr (de oproep tot het eerste gebed, vroeg in de ochtend), en dat wordt op radio en televisie uitgezonden.

Schrijft u zelf ook liedjes?

‘Door mijn opleiding kan ik muziek schrijven en componeren, maar ik kan helaas geen poëzie schrijven. Ik noemde  Mohammed Lahlu en Imam al-Bahr Darunish omdat ik liedjes van hen zing, maar  twee andere belangrijke componisten zijn mijn leermeester Ahmed AbdelQader (o. 1984) en shaykh Sayyid Mekkawi (o. 1997). Verder heb je bijvoorbeeld AbdelWahab Mohammed, Ammar al-Sharay en Helmi Amin.’

Wat maakte dat u koos voor voor een opleiding aan de Azhar?

‘Kijk, ik ben blind. Dan heb je op zich niet heel veel mogelijkheden in Egypte. De beste keuze is om je te wijden aan de islam, aan de Koran; dan kom je op een bepaalde leeftijd vanzelf bij de Azhar uit. Gelukkig heeft de religie altijd mijn interesse gehad.

Een voorbeeld van een blind iemand die desondanks veel heeft bereikt is trouwens Taha Husayn (1889-1973, een bekende Egyptische schrijver; een van zijn bekendste boeken is zijn autobiografie “Al-ayyam”, De Dagen). Hij kwam uit het zuiden van Egypte, uit de Sa`ied, maar hij heeft aan de Sorbonne in Parijs gestudeerd en een graad behaald, en hij was naast zijn schrijverschap ook actief als diplomaat. Hij was zelfs directeur van de Cairo University!

Nu ben ik officieel een munshid : ik werk als zanger voor de radio en het nationale theater. Het nationale theater valt onder het ministerie c.q. de raad van cultuur.

Had u, toen u aan het begin van uw opleiding aan de Azhar stond, kunnen bedenken dat u nu, jaren later, als een bekende Egyptische zanger van religieuze liederen hier in Nederland zou optreden?

‘Nee, in geen geval. Ik besef mij dat ik een bevoorrechte positie heb. Het is een geschenk van God dat ik herkend en erkend wordt, en dat ik wordt uitgenodigd om in het buitenland op te treden. Dat begon in 2002, vijf jaar geleden, toen ik optrad in het Opera-gebouw in Cairo. In Egypte is er trouwens een 21-koppige band om mij te begeleiden; dat is wat anders dan zoals ik hier nu optreed, met drie muzikanten.

Maar goed, in dat Opera-gebouw was tijdens het concert dat ik daar gaf iemand uit Marokko aanwezig, en deze man bewonderde mijn stem. Hij nodigde mij uit om in 2003 op te treden tijdens het festival voor musiqa ruhiya, religieuze muziek te Fès (het Fès Festival musiques sacrées du monde). Inmiddels heb ik daar nog vijf keer mogen optreden. Die eerste keer in Fès hoorde een Spaanse vrouw mij zingen, en zij nodigde mij vervolgens uit om het jaar daarop naar Spanje te komen. Dankzij haar trad ik in 2004 op in Barcelona en Girona. Daardoor heb ik Yoessef leren kennen (Yoessef Ghazi is shaykh Said Hafizs impresario. Hij woont in Barcelona, maar zijn wortels liggen bij de Amazigh in Marokko), en  Yoessef heeft ervoor gezorgd dat ik nu in Nederland ben. Hij heeft mij in contact gebracht met Gustavo Pazos Conde van de NPS.’

Met alles wat u tot nu toe heeft mogen bereiken in gedachten, waar kijkt u naar uit in de toekomst? Koestert u nog bepaalde verwachtingen of hoop om iets anders wezenlijks te bereiken?

Alhamdulilah, God zij dank voor alles in mijn leven. Toch zou ik graag in financieel opzicht er beter aan toe willen zijn, meer zelfstandig zeg maar, en mij daarover minder zorgen willen maken. Ik blijf blind, en ik heb wel een vrouw en dochter om voor te zorgen. Kijk, een mooie villa zou ook aardig zijn, en een goede nieuwe auto met chauffeur. Daarbij zou ik best meer bekend willen zijn in de rest van de wereld, maar vooral in Amerika en in Saoedi-Arabië. Amerika omdat het geweldig zou zijn om daar Arabischtalige religieuze muziek van de islam te laten klinken, en Saoedie-Arabië omdat ik daar helaas nog nooit heb opgetreden. Als hartland van de islamitische wereld is dat toch een droom van mij, om daar te mogen zingen. Momenteel geef ik ook les aan zowel mannen als vrouwen die religieuze muziek willen leren zingen, al zijn het meer mannen dan vrouwen. Dat geeft mij veel voldoening, om mijn kennis over te dragen en anderen op te leiden. En ik ben blij met mijn huidige positie als bekende zanger op de radio en televisie; ik heb toch een bijzondere plek wat dat betreft.’

U noemde uw vrouw en dochter. Wat betreft uw dochter, zou u willen dat zij een soortgelijke religieuze opleiding als u zou volgen? Of heeft u een andere levensinvulling voor haar in gedachten?

‘Mijn dochter, Aliya, is nu negen jaar. Ze heeft een mooie stem, maar ze wil graag lerares worden. Ik verwacht niets van haar in de zin van dat ze iets zou moeten of behoren te doen; dat mag zij zelf kiezen.’

Indien u de kans zou krijgen om opnieuw uw leven te leiden, wat zou u anders willen doen en wat zou u onveranderd laten?

‘Ik zou willen dat ik niet blind was, zodat ik voor mijzelf verantwoordelijk zou zijn, en niet afhankelijk van anderen. In principe ben ik blij met alles wat ik doe en heb gedaan. Misschien zou ik nog meer mijn best doen om te reizen en in meer landen op te treden, om mijn stem te laten horen. Ik had het eerder al over Amerika en Saoedie-Arabië, maar ik zou graag ook Israël bezoeken, en ik wil ooit nog eens in Parijs en Londen optreden.’

Waar bent u binnenkort te zien?

‘Ik ben voor twee gelegenheden dit voorjaar in de Maghreb te vinden, in Marokko. In april zal ik optreden tijdens een festival in Fès voor musiqa sufiya (soefimuziek), en in juni voor de zevende keer tijdens het internationaal gerenommeerde festival voor musiqa ruhiya (religieuze wereldmuziek; het befaamde Fès Festival musiques sacrées du monde). Ik kijk er naar uit om weer daar op te mogen treden. Inshallah, als God het wil.’

Said Hafiz and ensemble © AYA 2008
Said Hafiz and ensemble © AYA 2008
Said Hafiz and ensemble © AYA 2008
Said Hafiz and ensemble © AYA 2008

Missing Voices: MWMM

Een bewolkte zondagmiddag in Den Haag, 26 april 2009. De regen dreigt in de lucht als ik Theater De Regentes binnen loop. Later op de dag zullen zes moslima’s van diverse pluimage gaan optreden voor een ladies only publiek. Hun namen: Teema, Sarah Sayeed, Mizgin & Shohreh, Simona Abdallah en Bad Brya. Wat maakt deze zes vrouwen zo bijzonder? Geen van hen klinkt hetzelfde; noch zien ze er hetzelfde uit. Ze hebben ieder hun roots in diverse windstreken, maar wonen en werken in Groot Brittannië, Denemarken of Nederland. Ze verschillen qua leeftijd en levensverhaal. Dit hebben ze gemeen: ze zijn moslima, én muzikale performers en plein publique. En die combinatie is een ongewoon unicum.

 Bij De Regentes druppelen de geïnteresseerde meiden en vrouwen van diverse achtergronden langzaam binnen. Het is een bont en vrolijk gezelschap.

De 28-jarige Fatima Ben Hamou, ook wel bekend als Pheebz, opent die middag de reeks optredens als host van het programma. Sinds kort is zij verbonden aan het Amsterdamse SJA Meidenplaza, de meidenafdeling van het Stedelijk Jongerenwerk Amsterdam. Pheebz staat daar onder andere bekend om haar danskwaliteiten, door de masterclasses breakdance die ze daar geeft. Pheebz is namelijk een zogenaamde breaker. Zij laat het publiek kennismaken met twee van de drie drijvende krachten achter het project “Missing voices – Muslim Women Music Makers”: Naz Koser van het Engelse Ulfah Arts, en Fatima Zahrab van de Deense Global World Music Venue. Door de vragen die Pheebz Naz en Fatima voorlegt, wordt het publiek nog eens duidelijk gemaakt wat de achterliggende gedachte van “Missing Voices” is. Dat is namelijk aandacht vragen voor het ongekende muzikale talent van vele moslima’s; een podium creëren waarop dit op geheel eigen wijze getoond kan worden, en het begrip en respect voor het talent van deze meiden en vrouwen in moslimkringen hiermee in positieve zin beïnvloeden. En dat is een hele uitdaging.

Publiekelijk zingen of muziek maken is voor moslima’s in de ogen van sommige moslimgeleerden namelijk not done, en eigenlijk haram, verboden. Dat heeft alles te maken met heersende opvattingen wat betreft de religieuze en culturele perceptie van de rol en plaats van de vrouw in de samenleving. Volgens sommige islamitische geleerden blijkt uit de Koran, de sunna (de gewoonten en gedragingen van de profeet Mohammed), en de ahadith (overleveringen) dat vrouwen hun stem niet onnodig publiekelijk mogen laten horen. Ze mogen zichzelf ook niet in de volle aandacht van onbekende anderen stellen door hun gedrag. Dit zou namelijk de aandacht afleiden van het hogere, en het zou mannen verleiden om oneerbaar naar de vrouw in kwestie te kijken. De vrouw die zich toch zo gedraagt wordt vaak door dergelijke geleerden afgeschilderd als hoerig en losbandig. De Britse Naz heeft daar echter hele andere opvattingen over -en daarin staat ze niet alleen.

Naz trof gelijkgestemde zielen tijdens de World Music Expo (WOMEX) 2007, in het Spaanse Sevilla. Haar ontmoeting met de eerder genoemde Deense Fatima en de Nederlandse Wijnand Hollander (Marmoucha) zou leiden tot de oprichting van het MWMM project. Met een bijzonder succesvolle internationale samenwerking tot gevolg: dit jaar vond op Internationale Vrouwendag, 3 maart, in het Deense Kopenhagen het eerste “Missing Voices” concert plaats onder de supervisie van Fatima. Nederland is het tweede land dat werd aangedaan, waarbij Alice Hulshof namens Marmoucha de organisatie in strakke banen leidde. In mei zal nog een serie optredens in Engeland volgen.

En dan is het tijd voor muziek! Maar wat nu, zien we daar een man het podium oplopen? Het is DJ Badashi, aka Benjamin Hamid. Haar in een knot, bril op zijn neus; hij ziet er hip uit, in zijn bruine overhemd. Ondanks het ladies only karakter van de middag is zijn aanwezigheid vandaag gewenst: hij staat namelijk tijdens de optredens van een aantal dames achter de draaitafel. En ach; bovenin de zaal blijken nog twee heren van het geluid te zitten. En wie zou toch die witharige man zijn die daar vooraan al foto’s neemt?

Een applaus klinkt als vervolgens na DJ Badashi de Nederlandse zangeres Teema uit de coulissen komt; wellicht een nieuwe diva van de Arabische pop. Ergens doet haar stem me denken aan die van Hind. Teema’s stijl wordt wel omschreven als een mengeling van jazz, pop, dance en Arabische moderne en klassieke muziek. Dat is echter pas sinds de laatste jaren. Van jongs af aan was Teema al met muziek bezig, maar met haar Marokkaanse achtergrond heeft ze in haar tienerjaren niet direct voor de hand liggende muzikale wegen verkend: ze was actief in het Gospel World Choir, en trad her en der op met de R&B band Damez. Toch besloot Teema om de Arabische muziek weer te omarmen. Dat was een goede keuze, want inmiddels is haar ster rijzende, en wordt haar laatste single “Tiggy tiggy” op de populaire muziekzenders van Egypte, Noord-Afrika en het Midden-Oosten getoond; Zoom Mazzika en MTV Arabia. De dames in de zaal komen pas los bij dat nummer, het derde en laatste nummer dat Teema zingt. Later ontdek ik dat host Fatima aka Pheebz met een aantal andere breakers uit de Amsterdamse breakdanceformatie Soul Warriors Crew in Teema’s officiële videoclip van dat nummer figureert.

De tweede ‘Missing Voice’ is die van de Engelse zangeres, producer en MC Sarah Sayeed uit London. DJ Badashi maakt zich alvast op om voor haar te draaien. Zo klein en tenger als ze eruit ziet wanneer ze opkomt, zo verrast ben ik als ze begint te zingen en te rappen –want wat transformatie vindt er daar op dat podium plaats! Sarah loopt heen en weer tussen twee microfoons, om te rappen in de ene, en te zingen in de andere. Ze ziet er lief uit, in mijn ogen. Maar haar paardestaart zwiept heen en weer met haar hoofdbewegingen, en haar ogen flitsen als ze zingt over de staat waar de wereld zich volgens haar in bevindt. Desondanks gaat het niet alleen maar over politiek; ze heeft het ook over spiritualiteit, medemenselijkheid, en herwaardering van het vrouwelijke. Haar teksten liggen goed in het gehoor, en zijn afwisselend scherp, confronterend en fel. Toch is haar stem als ze zingt ook beheerst, zacht en mooi; een apart contrast. Sarah heeft Indiaas-Bengaalse wortels, die ze af en toe laat terugkomen in haar muziek in de vorm van zang, samples en ritmes. Verder hoor je jazzy invloeden en vette hip hop beats.

Het publiek krijgt hele andere muzikale koek bij het derde optreden: het duo Mizgin en Shohreh. DJ Badashi verlaat het podium, en ik ben verbaasd als ik een prachtige vrouw vanuit de coulissen zie komen –in een rolstoel. Dat had ik niet gezien op de promotiefoto’s! Mizgin heeft een sterke, heldere stem, en is ongelooflijk vaardig op de saz. Op de website van Missing Voices lees ik later dat Mizgin werd geboren in een bergdorpje in Turks-Koerdisch gebied. Ze was 2 jaar oud toen haar benen gedeeltelijk verlamd raakten door polio; hierdoor groeide ze geïsoleerd op, en kon ze niet naar school. Om de tijd door te brengen leerde Mizgin zichzelf zingen en de typisch Turkse saz, een snaarinstrument, te bespelen. Op haar 18e vertrok ze naar Istanbul, en spoedig daarna naar Denemarken. In 2007 werd Mizgin verkozen tot Deense vluchtelingartiest van het jaar.

Collega Shohreh komt uit Iran. Shohreh is een veelzijdige vrouw. Ze gaf schilderles in Teheran, en volgde opleidingen tot grafisch- en industrieel ontwerper. In Denemarken is ze actief als multimedia designer en kunstenares. Shohreh bespeelt de daff, een grote scheldrum met ringetjes aan de binnenlijst, en danst daarbij op haar gevoel. Ze schrijft ook dromerige elektronische muziek. De combinatie van die drie dingen noemt ze Innin, en daarmee treed ze ook als zelfstandig performer op.

Als Mizigin begint met spelen en zingen, danst Shohreh met een witte sjaal het podium op. Als Mizgin feller speelt, en haar zang in intensiteit toeneemt, gaat Shohreh zitten en pakt ze haar daff.

Diverse Turkse meiden achter mij beginnen mee te deinen en mee te zingen bij een bekend lied; en tot groot genoegen van Mizgin, Shohreh en de andere dames in de zaal komen ze met wat gegiechel naar het podium, om op traditionele Turkse manier in een rij met de handen ineen naast elkaar te dansen. Als Mizgin en Shohreh na een luid applaus en veel blij gejoel het podium willen verlaten om de pauze in te luiden, weet Pheebz hen nog een gewaardeerde toegift te ontlokken.

Na de pauze is het de beurt aan de Palestijnse Simona Abdallah, die in 1979 werd geboren in Duitsland, maar in 1986 met haar familie in Denemarken terecht kwam. In het dagelijks leven werkt ze als psychologische coach. Simona besloot op haar 15e zichzelf te leren om de darbuka en andere Arabische percussie-instrumenten te bespelen. Percussie-instrumenten worden in de Arabische wereld meestal gezien als mannelijk, en worden daarom doorgaans alleen door mannen bespeeld. Simona, als professioneel percussioniste, is hierop een bijzondere uitzondering. Haar droom: een album uitbrengen dat een mix is van Westerse en Arabische muziek, met invloeden uit rock en house.

Haar grote ogen haken zich in die van het publiek, en het lijkt wel alsof ze dat doet als uitnodiging om toch vooral te komen dansen op haar soms traag plagende, dan weer opzwepende ritmes. Ze speelt haar eigen spel op diverse nummers, variërend van Egyptische buikdansmuziek tot Arabische house en dance. Achter me hoor ik gelach, gejoel, en protesterende opmerkingen. Dezelfde Turkse dames die eerder bij Mizgin en Shohreh een dansje waagden, durven nu kennelijk toch niet te gaan dansen. Ik kijk om, en zie veel meiden en vrouwen heen en weer wiegen met verlangende blik; maar niemand komt naar voren om te dansen. Dan schud ikzelf de schroom van me af, knoop mijn sjaal om mijn heupen, en probeer me te herinneren hoe ook al weer mijn heupen en schouders vrij spel te geven om te bewegen op deze heerlijke muziek. Het werkt, want ineens bevolkt een vijfde van de zaal het podium. Simona kijkt blij, en trommelt met verve verder.

Hekkensluitster is de Amsterdamse Maryam Merabet, alias de van oorsprong Marokkaanse MC Bad Brya. Vorig jaar bracht ze haar eerste album uit, “Voicemail”, dat goed ontvangen werd. DJ Badisha ontfermt zich nu voor de gelegenheid over haar tracks. Zodra Bad Brya uit de coulissen komt valt me direct op dat zij, net als veel van de artiesten vandaag, klein is van postuur, maar een ware transformatie ondergaat op het podium. Ik vind het fantastisch om te zien wat een pit er van die kleine jonge vrouw uit gaat. Zo hip hop als ze eruit ziet, en zo ruig als de eerste songs klinken; ik sta versteld over de inhoud van haar woorden. Net als bij Sarah Sayeed hoor ik maatschappijkritische geluiden, kreten om zingeving en universeel respect, en liefde voor de medemens. Ik geniet; en met mij de zaal. Twee volle moslimmeiden met hoofddoek staan heftig mee te hip hoppen aan de zijkant van het podium, en ineens is daar Pheebz, die onverwacht midden op het podium een staaltje breakdance weggeeft waar iedereen helemaal van uit haar dak gaat. Gefluit en jubelende zaghruta’s zijn niet van de lucht. Zal ik je eens wat zeggen? Bad Brya is good.

En wat betreft het “Missing Voices” project an sich? Hulde aan Ulfah Arts, Marmoucha en Global World Music Venue –en aan al die dames on stage in dit project, die zo een lans breken voor elke ongehoorde muzikale moslima.

NB: De in de UK woonachtige zangeres Sarah Yaseen trad wegens omstandigheden niet op.

Hamid El Kasri

Vrijdagavond 28 maart 2008. Het is de avond voordat de zomertijd ingaat, en in Theaterzwembad De Regentes in Den Haag zal die avond een waar feestje gevierd worden. Nee; niet een Westers feestje, maar een aanstekelijk en uitbundig ritmespektakel van donkere Marokkaanse bodem. Menig bezoeker zal na afloop van het concert vooral nog lang het bezwerende effect van de opzwepende beat in zijn of haar lichaam hebben gevoeld.

Het is al half negen geweest als Gustavo Pazos Conde van de (voormalige) NPS het publiek in een korte introductie uiteenzet wat voor concert zij die avond precies gaan meemaken. Dat hijzelf een groot fan is van deze muziek, Marokkaanse Gnawa, mag blijken uit zijn enthousiaste gebaren en sympathieke woorden. Hij besluit zijn inleiding met een uitnodiging aan het publiek om vrijelijk de stoelen te verlaten om de ruimte voor het podium dansend of anderszins te bevolken als men zin heeft, om zich over te geven aan de muziek.

Dan is het podium eindelijk aan de imponerende Gnawa maâlem (meester) Hamid El Kasri en de vijf mannen die zijn ensemble vormen. Vanuit de coulissen zwelt het geluid van twee trommels aan, en een bijna oorverdovend geklepper barst los terwijl het gezelschap verschijnt. We zien Hamid El Kasri en een andere man elk een van de twee grote versierde trommels bespelen, een t’bal, en de vier overige mannen klepperen erop los met elk een qarqaba (grote achtvormige klepper van metaal) in hun linker- en rechterhand. Het is een daverende entree; het publiek is meteen flink wakker geschud. Dit belooft wat! De trommels worden weggezet, en de mannen nemen hun plaatsen in op het podium.

De innemende El Kasri bespeelt met verve de gumbri, een lange rechthoekige basluit met drie snaren. Zijn faam als vooraanstaand zanger binnen de rituele muziek van de Gnawa traditie lijkt hem op het lijf geschreven: wanneer hij zingt, doet hij dat met een warme, welluidende stem, en vol overtuigingskracht. De andere mannen zingen als in koorzang afwisselend met hem mee, met luide, schelle stem in Afrikaans aandoende stijl, terwijl ze hun qrâqab laten klinken. Van tijd tot tijd komt een van de mannen het podium af, om soms met duizelingwekkend voetenwerk te dansen voor het podium. Opvallend is de man rechts naast El Kasri: hij straalt een onmetelijk kracht en energie uit, en heeft gedurende het grootste gedeelte van het concert een enorme lach op zijn gezicht. Hij zet daarbij de meeste passen voor hem en zijn bijzangers in, en geeft hen het ritme aan.

Gnawa is onlosmakelijk verbonden met zwart Afrika, in meer dan een opzicht. Over de oorsprong van het woord zijn de meningen verdeeld: volgens sommigen betekent gnâwa ‘afkomstig uit Guinee’, maar volgens anderen is het direct gerelateerd aan het Berberse aguinaoua, hetgeen ‘de zwarten’ betekent. De term wordt in ieder geval gebruikt om de zwarte en donkere mensen in Marokko aan te duiden van wie de afstamming terug gaat op zwarte slaven uit landen ten zuiden van de Sahara. Ook staat de term voor een Marokkaanse soefi-orde, die veel Berberse en animistische West-Afrikaanse kenmerken vertoond. Daarnaast duidt de term de Noord- en West-Afrikaanse rituele muziek aan die het in feite is. Het leidt tot trance bij de deelnemers aan het ritueel, de zogenaamde lila, waarbij djinni (geesten) worden uitgedreven en baraka (zegen) wordt verkregen, en waarbij de deelnemer zijn m’louk, de zeven eigen geesten, om raad vraagt. Deze rituelen kennen bepaalde stadia die gerelateerd zijn aan de fases van vervoering, waarbij bepaalde kleuren van bijvoorbeeld kleding, bepaalde typen wierook en bepaalde handelingen ieder een eigen rol spelen.

Los van de muziek, de immense energie van de mannen en het onuitputtelijke geklepper van hun qrâqab -wat zien we een kleur op dat podium! El Kasri zelf is gekleed in een glanzende, geborduurde lichtblauwe jellaba gnaouia over zwarte kleding, met keurige zwarte schoenen  en met een zwart hoofddeksel. Zijn mannen dragen eveneens glanzende, maar goud-gele jellaba’s met eenzelfde patroon qua borduursel (dat bij hen echter geborduurd is in bruin-zwarte kleuren), met daaronder een zwarte trui, witte broek, witte sokken, een geel hoofddeksel, en knalgele belagha (spreek uit bèlera, slofjes). Naar de symbolische betekenis van hun kleding kan ik slechts raden, maar zeker is dat het ergens voor staat.

Een aantal mensen uit het publiek, vooral dames, geeft gedurende het concert voor het podium in verstilde beweging uiting aan wat de spirituele lading van de muziek met ze doet. Eén jonge vrouw, in zwierige kleding en met wapperende sjaal, draait als een volleerde Turkse derwish minutenlang rond –een wat vreemde eend in het harde geklepper van deze Marokkaans-Afrikaanse bijt, maar onverwacht harmonieus: trance blijft trance.

Met veel gejoel en gefluit vraagt het publiek na afloop van het concert om een toegift –en die geven de heren, met veel steelse blikken naar elkaar, en ja; olijke snuiten –ik kan niet anders zeggen. Een van de Gnawa’s springt van het podium af om mensen in het publiek te vragen te komen dansen. Als dan uiteindelijk ruim een kwart van het publiek vervolgens de weg vindt naar diezelfde ruimte voor het podium om tóch nog even los te gaan, zien Hamid en zijn mannen er ronduit tevreden uit.

Hamid El Kesri & coQraqab player  Hamid El Kesri with guembriHamid El Kesri with guembri Qraqab playersHamid El Kesri & co

Aygun Baylar

Donderdagavond 27 februari 2008, Den Haag. Theaterzwembad De Regentes gonst vanaf acht uur van de vele gesprekken in het Azeri, de taal van Azerbeidjan. De grote zaal zit goed vol; er is zo’n honderd man publiek aanwezig, waaronder heel veel Nederlandse Azerbeidjanen. Het concert van de veelbelovende Azerbeidjaanse mugam zangeres Aygun Baylar staat op het punt te beginnen, en de verwachtingen in de zaal zijn hoog gespannen. Ik herken enkele gezichten in de zaal van het gevarieerde middagprogramma van Selam Netwerk, eerder die dag. Een jonge danser en danseres voerden toen een prachtige Azerbeidjaanse spirituele dans uit, en diverse gastsprekers belichtten de positie van vluchtelingenvrouwen in Azerbeidjan in het kader van Internationale Vrouwendag.

Iets na half negen komt een prachtig geklede, kleine zangeres met twee muzikanten het podium op. Een daverend applaus barst los. Maar dan, zodra de muzikanten de eerste mugam inzetten en de heldere stem van Aygun klinkt, is het ineens muisstil. Samen met de twee muzikanten vult de 32-jarige Aygun de zaal met een meeslepende melodie, die als een rivier soms zachtjes kabbelt, en dan weer klatert; maar die ook kan razen en vol overtuigingskracht buiten haar oevers treedt. Wat een stem! Wat een muziek! Vanaf het eerste moment voel ik me gegrepen: ik heb kippenvel op mijn armen, een brok in mijn keel, en een heel, heel warm gevoel van binnen. Ik begrijp nu waarom deze vrouw twee jaar geleden in Marokko door recenseurs werd bestempeld als ‘dé ontdekking van het Festival de Fès des Musiques Sacrées du Monde.’

Aygun Baylar vertolkt op fenomenale wijze het genre van de ghazal, oude en moderne gedichten over zowel de wereldse als mystieke liefde, legendarische verhalen en heldendichten. Naar de oude traditie van de Azerbeidjaanse mugam bespeelt zij ook de daff, een grote tamboerijn met in plaats van schellen kleine metalen ringetjes aan de binnenkant van het frame. De pas 25-jarige maar veel ouder lijkende jongeman rechts naast Aygun begeleidt haar vakkundig op de tar, een traditioneel Azerbeidjaans snaarinstrument met lange hals en een dubbele klankkast in de vorm van een acht. Een wat oudere, statige man rechts van de tar-speler bespeelt een ander traditioneel Azerbeidjaans instrument; de kamanche. Dit is een vedel, de voorloper van de viool, die ook binnen de Iraanse en Armeense muziektraditie een prominente plaats inneemt.

Het valt me op hoe intens Aygun en haar muzikanten samenspelen; hun energie is bijna voelbaar, blikken gaan over en weer, en wisselende emotie is op ieders gezicht af te lezen. De vijf mugams die Aygun Baylar en haar muzikanten laten horen vertegenwoordigen ieder dan ook een ander type van de mugam muziek. En ondanks dat ik geen Azeri versta, en daardoor helaas de gezongen tekst niet begrijp; de muziek maakt het overduidelijk wat voor soort gevoelens er worden bedoeld.

Verschillende malen krijgt Aygun bijval vanuit het publiek, wat op het laatst een stralende lach op haar mooie ronde gezicht teweeg brengt. Het enthousiasme van haar landgenoten in de zaal doet haar zichtbaar goed, en op hun verzoek brengt ze als toegift een hartstochtelijk en vrolijk aanstekend lied over Azerbeidjan ten gehore. En als de laatste noten van de tar en kamanche wegsterven en Aygun haar daff met kuiltjes in haar wangen neerlegt, komt de allerkleinste fan het podium oplopen -om de eerste te zijn die haar terecht bedankt voor een meesterlijk concert.

Interessante links:

– Aygun Baylar beschreven in het blog-archief van radio 6, voor het programma Passaat.

– Aygun Baylar tijdens het Festival de Fès des Musiques Sacrées du Monde 2006, Marokko.

– Samarkand Sharq Taronalari Festival 2005, Oezbekistan, gewonnen door Aygun Baylar.

– Informatie over de Azerbeidjaanse mugam.

Selam Netwerk

TarDSC00934
Aygun Baylar
Kamanche

Frank Boeijen

Op 1 maart 2007 trad Frank Boeijen op in Odeon te Zwolle. Hoewel ik een groot liefhebber ben, viel zijn optreden indertijd behoorlijk tegen. Onderstaande ‘recensie’ schetst mijn ervaring van het concert.

 

Zeg, waar was jij dan, verloren man, alleen, daar in het donker..?

Waar was jij dan, vergeten man, omringd door je gedachten..?

De wereld wachtte aan je voeten, maar jij moest boeten

Voor een nacht zonder slaap

Of een glas teveel, op de leegte in je leven..

 

En wat deed jij dan, verweesde man, alleen, daar met je vrienden..?

Wat deed jij dan, vervreemde man, omringd door de verwachting..?

Zoveel verachting in je ogen –was alles dan gelogen?

Ieder woord, ongehoord, door de weemoed overstemd

-Of de kilte in je hart, verward als je leek..

 

Je leek wel losgeslagen, in niet-gedragen zinnen

Wist niet waar te beginnen, laat staan waar op te houden

Kon je niet vertrouwen op de stilte in je ziel?

 

Ah, mijn hart ging naar je uit; ik wilde je omarmen

Je eenzaamheid verwarmen, en je dan weer laten gaan

Ik zou je liefde geven… daar, in Odeon

 

Waar het nieuwe slechts een schuilplaats biedt aan wat reeds is vergaan

Maar waar de zanger zich verloor bij het wassen van de maan

Waar de illusie van de grootheid in het niet valt bij het lied

En waar het podium te groot bleek voor de schaduw van verdriet

 

Dus zeg, wie ben je dan, verwarde man, alleen, daar diep van binnen..?

Wie ben je dan, verlegen man, omringd door al je twijfel..?

Is dit de prijs die je betaalt voor verschaalde herinneringen

Die je blijft bezingen, door het leven overmand

-Of een leven vol verliezen, omdat je niet kon kiezen voor de inhoud of het glas..

 

Want jij, jij houdt jezelf gevangen in het rouwen om wat was

Maar je moet de dood vergeven, om te herrijzen uit je as

En ‘De liefde gaat..’ de liefde gaat.

-Ga je met haar mee?

 

 

 

 

Interview with Aygun Baylar

This interview was conducted at 28-02-2008 in Theatre De Regentes, The Hague (NL), in the presence of Alegez, the female manager of Aygun. It was enabled by Gustavo Pazos Conde, NPS producer.

Interview: Ninu Arvaladze
Translation: Jenia Gutova
Adaptation: Daniëlle Dürst Britt
Pictures: Daniëlle Dürst Britt

We would like to ask you some questions about the special type of music you perform, the mugam. To start with; since the mugam has quite a history in Azerbaijan, what place does it currently occupy in the Azerbaijani music scene?
The mugam occupies an important place among the various music of the world; different kinds of world music are actually based on it. We could state that the mugam is like a “mother” or “father” of world music. We are happy that the mugam kind of originated in Azerbaijan; it is our native music. Nowadays, thanks to the spouse of president Mehriban Aliyeva, our mugam has become an official part of world music as well. Due to this development it is protected by UNESCO. We are glad that our music is known and loved throughout the world.

What is the context in which the mugam is played in Azerbaijan today? Is it, for instance, typically played at weddings, or during important celebrational gatherings?
Well, the mugam can be played on weddings, but it is primarily professional music. It is not particularly suited for weddings. The thing is that this music is not only difficult to perform; it is difficult to be properly perceived, as well! It has a deep philosophy, and as such this kind of music is best appreciated in a “chamber” atmosphere. That is why it is not really suited for dancing, weddings, or mere amusement; it is a serious art.

I have read that the mugam was associated with the urban elite of Azerbaijan. Is that still the case?
Yes, in a way that is still the case; the mugam is still related to the elite, yet in the realm of professionals who are able to understand it. Luckily, I am able to travel and perform abroad; but it is very nice that there are so many ‘professionals’ from European, Western countries, and as well as from the East, who during their attendance of our concerts are able to receive our mugam so warmly.

About the Baku conservatory, in the capital of Azerbaijan, is that accessible to everybody?
Yes, of course. Everybody can study there, if only he or she has talent. There are two conservatories in Azerbaijan: the Folk Music Academy, where folk art is taught, and the Folk Conservatory and the Classic Music Academy.

So, everybody who has talent can enroll?
I think you could say that everybody is talented in Azerbaijan! As soon as children are born and put into a cradle, they start to absorb the “couleur” of Azerbaijan, and its air. Because of this, people are talented, and sing from their childhood onwards. I was told I started singing when I was 3-4 years old; I would have been both playing and singing since then. Later, I graduated from the school where I was taught to play the naghara and the daff, particular types of drum.

Your father played the stringed tar, is that correct?
Yes, he played the tar, but he never received official education. However, in Azerbaijan you don’t necessarily need official education in order to perform your music on a stage. Anybody with talent will be acknowledged by others, and this person will be granted the opportunity to perform, also without a diploma.

During the concert you performed yesterday in Antwerpen, I noticed that the interaction between you and your musicians is rather intense. How long have you three been performing together?
We work together for 3 to 4 years now. But I think that musicians, even if they are not originally from Azerbaijan, come to ‘feel’ each other very quickly. Imagine that, right now, there would be some musicians from different countries gathered here; then they would arrange a jam session. In fact, I had this experience at a festival in Uzbekistan, when musicians from different regions played their distinctive ‘oeuvres’, while joining together in such a jam session.

You are a female performer of the mugam. However, I understood that only since the beginning of the 20th century women have been allowed or enabled to perform the mugam. Is there any difference in the reception of female performers by the public?
No; women are also received very well. Again, one’s talent counts the most, whether you are a man or a woman. When you sing well, the public will respond.

Is there any symbolism or traditionalism involved in your choice of dress when you perform?
When I was 15 or 16 years old, I used to play the naghara when I would sing. However, the naghara is generally an instrument for men, since it is a drum. Back then, I was wearing already a hat like the hat I wear now during performances. On stage I wear traditional clothes, with the hat. Honestly, I think I would not be able to sing well without this hat: without the hat, I feel not confident in myself, nor in my singing. The hat makes me feel another person; a man. With the hat I am not afraid of music; I am not afraid of anything.

When you received your education at the conservatory of Baku, where there more girls or women being educated?
Yes, there were many women studying there; they sing well. However, they perform differently, since each of them has her own character and style.

Since your father was a famous musician, you must have been confronted at an early age with music. You told us that you started to sing and play already on a very early age, indeed. But when did you discover within yourself that you were especially passionate about the mugam?
I started when I was 16 or 17 years old; that is already 15 years ago! I used to listen to modern performances of the music of our famous composers, musicians, and singers from the Karabakh region of Azerbaijan. The music of the mugam originated in that area. Of course, the old singers are not alive any more, but their music lives on. They are still popular in Azerbaijan.

During the performances, the poetry that is being recited or sung addresses mainly the subject of love, both earthly and other-worldly; especially in the category of the ghazal. This can be associated with its relation to the geographical influence of the Shi’a branch of Islam. How do you experience these lyrics yourself, and what do they mean to you in the realm of love and spirituality?
You are absolutely right with what you say, but I was not really thinking about it myself, yet. The mugam speaks often about love, love that unites humans, and humans and god. If you want to perform this genre, you have to have a big heart, a large soul. When your soul is large, your love becomes great, and your love might encompass the whole world.

Could you say something about the origin of these lyrics?
Many lyrics were written some 500 years ago, by famous poets.

Do you prepare yourself in a certain way before you have to perform on stage?
We rehearse a lot! I also sing at home, but especially just before the concert, some 1 to 1,5 hour in advance. I have to do that, in order to enable my fingers and my voice to do their work during the performance. We take it very seriously, and we prepare ourselves seriously. We have a big orchestra in Azerbaijan. When I was 15 or 16 years old, my teacher created it. This ensemble works for 15 years already; and still there are many ideas and projects for the future.

You are considered a very gifted singer. Some people regard you as the new international representative of the Azerbaijani mugam, next to Alim Qasimov. He is rather well-known in the West. How do you regard your own future? Do you have specific dreams, for instance?
I know that I am very talented, hahaha! Well, of course I dream of many projects in the future. We have big plans, and big dreams, likewise. It is only recently that we started to travel around to perform like this, and perhaps we want everything at the same time. For example, it would be great to record a performance with a Dutch orchestra, with a choir, and to participate at festivals. But we will see what will happen, God willing.

Dsc00986Dsc00998Dsc00554

Interview with Aygun Baylar

This interview was conducted at 28-02-2008 in Theatre De Regentes, The Hague (NL), in the presence of Alegez, the female manager of Aygun. It was enabled by Gustavo Pazos Conde, NPS producer.

Interview: Ninu Arvaladze
Translation: Jenia Gutova
Adaptation: Daniëlle Dürst Britt
Pictures: Daniëlle Dürst Britt

We would like to ask you some questions about the special type of music you perform, the mugam. To start with; since the mugam has quite a history in Azerbaijan, what place does it currently occupy in the Azerbaijani music scene?
The mugam occupies an important place among the various music of the world; different kinds of world music are actually based on it. We could state that the mugam is like a “mother” or “father” of world music. We are happy that the mugam kind of originated in Azerbaijan; it is our native music. Nowadays, thanks to the spouse of president Mehriban Aliyeva, our mugam has become an official part of world music as well. Due to this development it is protected by UNESCO. We are glad that our music is known and loved throughout the world.

What is the context in which the mugam is played in Azerbaijan today? Is it, for instance, typically played at weddings, or during important celebrational gatherings?
Well, the mugam can be played on weddings, but it is primarily professional music. It is not particularly suited for weddings. The thing is that this music is not only difficult to perform; it is difficult to be properly perceived, as well! It has a deep philosophy, and as such this kind of music is best appreciated in a “chamber” atmosphere. That is why it is not really suited for dancing, weddings, or mere amusement; it is a serious art.

I have read that the mugam was associated with the urban elite of Azerbaijan. Is that still the case?
Yes, in a way that is still the case; the mugam is still related to the elite, yet in the realm of professionals who are able to understand it. Luckily, I am able to travel and perform abroad; but it is very nice that there are so many ‘professionals’ from European, Western countries, and as well as from the East, who during their attendance of our concerts are able to receive our mugam so warmly.

About the Baku conservatory, in the capital of Azerbaijan, is that accessible to everybody?
Yes, of course. Everybody can study there, if only he or she has talent. There are two conservatories in Azerbaijan: the Folk Music Academy, where folk art is taught, and the Folk Conservatory and the Classic Music Academy.

So, everybody who has talent can enroll?
I think you could say that everybody is talented in Azerbaijan! As soon as children are born and put into a cradle, they start to absorb the “couleur” of Azerbaijan, and its air. Because of this, people are talented, and sing from their childhood onwards. I was told I started singing when I was 3-4 years old; I would have been both playing and singing since then. Later, I graduated from the school where I was taught to play the naghara and the daff, particular types of drum.

Your father played the stringed tar, is that correct?
Yes, he played the tar, but he never received official education. However, in Azerbaijan you don’t necessarily need official education in order to perform your music on a stage. Anybody with talent will be acknowledged by others, and this person will be granted the opportunity to perform, also without a diploma.

During the concert you performed yesterday in Antwerpen, I noticed that the interaction between you and your musicians is rather intense. How long have you three been performing together?
We work together for 3 to 4 years now. But I think that musicians, even if they are not originally from Azerbaijan, come to ‘feel’ each other very quickly. Imagine that, right now, there would be some musicians from different countries gathered here; then they would arrange a jam session. In fact, I had this experience at a festival in Uzbekistan, when musicians from different regions played their distinctive ‘oeuvres’, while joining together in such a jam session.

You are a female performer of the mugam. However, I understood that only since the beginning of the 20th century women have been allowed or enabled to perform the mugam. Is there any difference in the reception of female performers by the public?
No; women are also received very well. Again, one’s talent counts the most, whether you are a man or a woman. When you sing well, the public will respond.

Is there any symbolism or traditionalism involved in your choice of dress when you perform?
When I was 15 or 16 years old, I used to play the naghara when I would sing. However, the naghara is generally an instrument for men, since it is a drum. Back then, I was wearing already a hat like the hat I wear now during performances. On stage I wear traditional clothes, with the hat. Honestly, I think I would not be able to sing well without this hat: without the hat, I feel not confident in myself, nor in my singing. The hat makes me feel another person; a man. With the hat I am not afraid of music; I am not afraid of anything.

When you received your education at the conservatory of Baku, where there more girls or women being educated?
Yes, there were many women studying there; they sing well. However, they perform differently, since each of them has her own character and style.

Since your father was a famous musician, you must have been confronted at an early age with music. You told us that you started to sing and play already on a very early age, indeed. But when did you discover within yourself that you were especially passionate about the mugam?
I started when I was 16 or 17 years old; that is already 15 years ago! I used to listen to modern performances of the music of our famous composers, musicians, and singers from the Karabakh region of Azerbaijan. The music of the mugam originated in that area. Of course, the old singers are not alive any more, but their music lives on. They are still popular in Azerbaijan.

During the performances, the poetry that is being recited or sung addresses mainly the subject of love, both earthly and other-worldly; especially in the category of the ghazal. This can be associated with its relation to the geographical influence of the Shi’a branch of Islam. How do you experience these lyrics yourself, and what do they mean to you in the realm of love and spirituality?
You are absolutely right with what you say, but I was not really thinking about it myself, yet. The mugam speaks often about love, love that unites humans, and humans and god. If you want to perform this genre, you have to have a big heart, a large soul. When your soul is large, your love becomes great, and your love might encompass the whole world.

Could you say something about the origin of these lyrics?
Many lyrics were written some 500 years ago, by famous poets.

Do you prepare yourself in a certain way before you have to perform on stage?
We rehearse a lot! I also sing at home, but especially just before the concert, some 1 to 1,5 hour in advance. I have to do that, in order to enable my fingers and my voice to do their work during the performance. We take it very seriously, and we prepare ourselves seriously. We have a big orchestra in Azerbaijan. When I was 15 or 16 years old, my teacher created it. This ensemble works for 15 years already; and still there are many ideas and projects for the future.

You are considered a very gifted singer. Some people regard you as the new international representative of the Azerbaijani mugam, next to Alim Qasimov. He is rather well-known in the West. How do you regard your own future? Do you have specific dreams, for instance?
I know that I am very talented, hahaha! Well, of course I dream of many projects in the future. We have big plans, and big dreams, likewise. It is only recently that we started to travel around to perform like this, and perhaps we want everything at the same time. For example, it would be great to record a performance with a Dutch orchestra, with a choir, and to participate at festivals. But we will see what will happen, God willing.

Dsc00986Dsc00998Dsc00554

Interview met Gnawa maalem Hamid El Kasri

Dsc01437 Dsc01397 Dsc01542

.

.

.

Dit interview kwam 28-03-2008 tot stand in Theater de Regentes te Den Haag, met dank aan Gustavo Pazos Conde, NPS producer, en Youssef Ghazi, impresario van Hamid El Kasri.

.

Interview: Salaheddin Ben Cherifa

Vertaling: Touria Agrandi

Bewerking: Daniëlle Dürst Britt

Foto’s: Daniëlle Dürst Britt

.

Aardig wat mensen in Europa zijn inmiddels bekend met Gnawa muziek, die diepe Marokkaanse wortels heeft. Hoe heeft die Gnawa muziek zich eigenlijk zo kunnen wortelen, en wanneer?

Sultan Moelay Ismail, die eind 17e, begin 18e eeuw de regio regeerde vanuit Meknes, haalde mensen van de Tagnawet stam als slaven uit zwart Afrika, om ze te gebruiken als soldaten. Ze waren één van vele stammen in dat gebied die op dergelijke wijze in Marokko terecht kwamen. De Marokkaanse heersers betrokken in principe slaven van elke stam, op basis van het feit dat zij als heersers de macht over heel zwart Afrika hadden. Toen de regeertijd van sultan Moelay Ismail voorbij was, verspreidden deze Tagnawet zich over heel Marokko; Fez, Meknes, Oujda, Essaouira, Marrakech, en Tanger. Zij namen hun eigen, streekgebonden muzikale tradities met zich mee; bijvoorbeeld de djballa en de tarab al-andalusi. Sommige Tagnawet vormden een muziekgroep, waarin ze bombrawiyen uitvoerden. Dat is een bepaald ritueel van zingen en dansen dat we nu nog gebruiken: dan zetten we bijvoorbeeld ’s avonds een dienblad met thee voor onze gasten neer die komen kijken, terwijl ze met elkaar over allerhande, daarmee samenhangende zaken spreken. Om terug te komen op de Tagnawet; toen de mensen uit die generatie Tagnawets in Marokko overleden, bleven hun kinderen en kleinkinderen in Marokko wonen. De stijl van de Tagnawet ontwikkelde zich tot een eigen muziekvorm, die naar zijn oorsprong tagnawe ofwel Gnawa heet. Tegenwoordig zingen vooral Moelay Abdelkader en Said El Wali deze stijl nog. Er is geen God dan Allah! Het is de belangrijkste muzikale basis die we in Marokko hebben.

.

Dus er is, om precies te zijn, geen enkele streek in Marokko die beschouwd kan worden als de enige echte Gnawa streek? In Spanje denken sommige mensen bijvoorbeeld bij het horen van bepaalde zigeunermuziek direct aan de regio van Sevilla.

Nee, want Gnawa muziek komt in heel Marokko voor; in Essaouira, Marrakech, Tanger, Asilah, Qasr, Meknes en Fez. De Tagnawet hebben hun stijlen overal in die streken achtergelaten. Gnawa is in feite een verzamelnaam voor hun rijke muziektraditie, en is afgeleid van de Agna-stam. Dit is wat ik er van weet, en wat ik ervan begrepen heb vanaf het moment dat ik een kind van zeven was. Ik heb het in deze vorm gezien, en ik heb er over gepraat met slaven. Wat ik je vertel, is wat zij mij hierover hebben verteld. Het is niet zo dat ik er onderzoek naar heb gedaan; maar ik heb me er wel wat in verdiept, in mijn jonge jaren. Oudere mensen vertelden mij bijvoorbeeld het verhaal van eerdergenoemde sultan Moelay Ismail, en spraken over Mansoer ad-Dahabi. Die twee mannen waren degenen die de Tagnawet als slaven naar Marokko haalden –en door hun toedoen heeft de muziek van de Tagnawet uiteindelijk een muzikale voet aan de Marokkaanse grond gekregen. Wat wij tegenwoordig doen, deden de eerste Tagnawet die in Marokko kwamen niet; die hielden hooguit een bombraweyin. We kunnen een Gnawa vers uit hun tijd zingen omdat die van generatie op generatie overgeleverd zijn, maar we begrijpen eigenlijk niet wat we dan zeggen. We hebben slechts geleerd dat we het zo dienen te zingen; maar wat bijvoorbeeld wangori wangori of marvoso betekent in hun oude taal, dat weten wij niet! Hun verzen zijn de verzen die zijzelf mee hebben genomen; ze hebben niet de acts overgeleverd die wij tegenwoordig ’s avonds laten zien. Die acts hebben zich later ontwikkeld.

.

Is er dan duidelijk sprake van bepaalde ontwikkelingen in bijvoorbeeld de kleding die Gnawa muzikanten dragen, en het materiaal ervan? Of in de vorm van de melodie en de lofdichten?

De ontwikkelingen binnen de Gnawa beïnvloedde alle onderdelen ervan. De trommels die wij gebruiken, de t’bal, die zijn nu versierd. Dat was vroeger niet het geval. De kleding van de gnawa was iets erfelijks; die bestond uit oude lappen of kleden die men derbal of qassaba noemde. Nu trekken we iets aan dat we zelf gepast vinden, en waarvan de stof versierd is. We kiezen echter wel voor een kleur die gerelateerd is aan de Gnawa; dat kan geel, rood, wit of zwart zijn. Het repertoire van de Gnawa is in de loop van de tijd ook veranderd. Nu zingen we bijvoorbeeld op een podium; dat was vroeger niet zo, toen werden Gnawa avonden in een informele setting georganiseerd. Soms hield men onderling feesten, maar die werden beschouwd als iets van het gewone volk. De Gnawa’s voerden jaren geleden vooral acts op, en brachten de nacht door met veel lawaai en vermaak. Nu is het meer wat wij doen: optreden bij festivals. De Gnawa’s worden tegenwoordig alom gewaardeerd om hun muziek: het werd eerder niet in die hoedanigheid erkend.

.

Toen ik klein was luisterde ik (Salaheddin Ben Cherifa) naar de bekende band Nas al-Ghewan. Ik herinner me dat sommige van hun ritmes mij deden denken aan Gnawa muziek waar ik mee bekend was. Niet alleen hun manier van zingen kwam me bekend voor in dat opzicht, maar ook de zawiya, het verschijnsel van spirituele broederschappen die bijeenkomen rond de begraafplaats van een heilige. Zijn er mensen die zeggen dat, als zij jullie Gnawa muziek horen, jullie daardoor bij een bepaalde broederschap zouden horen?

Het is niet raar dat je overeenkomsten hoort tussen de ritmes van de Nas al-Ghewan en de Gnawa’s. Nas al-Ghewan heeft namelijk veel zangritmes van de Gnawa’s overgenomen, omdat degenen die met Nas al-Ghewan samenwerkten zelf ook Gnawa’s waren. Toen de Gnawa zich ontwikkelde binnen de Marokkaanse gemeenschap heeft het zich alleen niet zo divers ontwikkeld dat je onderscheid kan maken tussen Gnawa uit het noorden en Gnawa uit Salé of Rabat. Maar er kan vaak wel enig onderscheid gemaakt worden op basis van het dialect dat wordt gebruikt tijdens de zang; of je nou uit Tanger, Rabat, Marrakech of Essaouira komt; je zingt altijd in de stijl van je dialect.

.

Wil dat zeggen dat u en uw gezelschap dan niet gebruik maken van een intima’, een bepaald symbool, waardoor men weet dat u uit een bepaalde streek komt of bij een bepaalde zawiya hoort?

Als je het mij vraagt komen wij allemaal uit dezelfde streek: we behoren uiteindelijk allemaal tot de stam van de Tagnawet. Gnawa is Gnawa; er bestaat geen wezenlijk verschil tussen Gnawa uit het noorden of zuiden. We zijn allemaal broeders van elkaar, en we komen bijeen in bepaalde seizoenen; dan maken we lol, en lachen we samen. Soms staat er bji zo’n bijeenkomst iemand op die spontaan tarh begint te doen, een bepaalde dans. En terwijl wij ons dan met hem vermaken, neemt de aanwezige Gnawa maâlem die tarh over. Gnawa is tegenwoordig een algemeen begrip, zowel in het binnenland als in het noorden. Maar iedereen weet wat de noorderlingen erover zeggen, en iedereen weet wat wij uit het binnenland erover zeggen: namelijk, dat het niet meer is wat het vroeger was.

.

Als u wordt gevraagd om te komen spelen tijdens een feest of iets dergelijks, is er dan vanaf het begin een duidelijke focus op het onderwerp dat centraal moet staan in dat wat u zingt?

Meestal gaat het over een speciale avond of nacht, zoals een belangrijke, heilige avond. Die wordt bezocht door vele mensen. Diegene die het regelt komt je vier, vijf à zes dagen van tevoren waarschuwen, om je te vertellen wanneer je als groep wordt verwacht. Je gaat dan die betreffende avond netjes gekleed naar die gelegenheid, zonder onder invloed te zijn van alcohol. Dat is de avond van djedba, een bepaalde Gnawa dansvorm, waarbij er veel wierook wordt gebrand. Die avond heeft haar eigen repertoire, en dat gaat door tot aan de dageraad.

.

Begrijp ik goed dat het repertoire dan dus niet ingaat op de jeugd van tegenwoordig of op wat er zich in de maatschappij afspeelt?

Ja, dat begrijp je goed. Het enige wat er gedurende deze nacht gebeurt, is dat de bezoeker van die avond door de Gnawa tot rust komt in zijn hoofd. Als hij die avond opstaat, dan is dat om te dansen. Dat doet hij omdat hij in een moeilijke situatie zit; hij danst om het te vergeten. Net zoals iedereen die Bob Marley hoort gaat dansen en zichzelf vergeet.

.

Als u de Gnawa zou categoriseren ten opzichte van de vele andere soorten Marokkaanse muziek, onder welke categorie zou u het dan plaatsen? En is er veel vraag naar?

Gnawa is zowel in Marokko geliefd als in andere landen, zoals in Europa. Mensen vermaken zich ermee, maar eigenlijk zonder dat ze echt begrijpen waar het nou over gaat. Dat zien we vooral tijdens onze concerten in het buitenland: het publiek kent doorgaans onze taal niet, zijn geen Marokkanen of Arabieren, maar proberen toch om er naar te luisteren en het te begrijpen. Ze zijn onder de indruk van de muziek en de zang zoals het op hen overkomt. In Marokko merken we dat ook. Als je in Marokko een klein kind vraagt of het weet wat Gnawa is, dan zegt hij; ‘Ja, ik heb de CD van Korret, en ik luister ernaar!’ Als je hem dan zou vragen om een stukje te zingen, dan zingt hij dat ook voor je –ondanks het feit dat hij klein is. Zo gaat het soms ook in het buitenland, God zij dank.

.

Dus het is niet muziek die speciaal is toegespitst op de oudere generatie?

Nee, Gnawa is algemeen. Het is een type muziek waarnaar men luistert om innerlijke rust te vinden. Mensen vinden het fijn om er naar te luisteren.

.

Maar wat betreft de mensen die naar Gnawa luisteren zonder de taal te begrijpen -en die dus niet weten wat er gezegd wordt; is het niet zo dat zij door het ritme beïnvloed raken, en op basis daarvan concluderen dat het wel iets religieus zal zijn?

Er zijn tegenwoordig verzen in omloop die heel rustig zijn, en waarin woorden voorkomen die aan God gerelateerd zijn. Als de luisteraar de taal niet begrijpt, maar alsnog de muziek zo begrijpt zoals jij het zegt, dan zou dus alleen de uitstraling van de muziek hem of haar al hebben kunnen inspireren tot een dergelijke gedachte.

.

Zingt u ook over zaken die betrekking hebben op wat er in de samenleving gebeurt, of over recht en onrecht?

Nee, dat is niet gebruikelijk in de symbooltaal van de Gnawa. We mengen ons niet in dat soort zaken. We zingen vooral over de aard van goedheid en over goede mensen die ooit in Marokko leefden maar daar niet zo bekend zijn. We eren hen op die wijze. We halen er liever geen zaken bij die ooit door onze voorvaderen uit Afrika zijn ingebracht maar die ons tegenwoordig niets meer zeggen, alhoewel we soms verzen zingen die we niet begrijpen. Het kan bijvoorbeeld zijn dat we vargo vargo siyi marvo siyi zingen, terwijl we geen idee hebben wat het betekent. Aangezien er nooit iets over is opgetekend, weten we niet waar die woorden op slaan, en hoe ze precies uitgesproken dienen te worden.

.

Kunt u ons zeggen of er een verband is tussen soefisme en Gnawa?

Binnen het soefisme vind je veel spirituele muziek; Gnawa is zelf ook een en al spiritualiteit. Dat is het enige verband; en daarin zit eigenlijk geen verschil. Het ene ligt besloten in het andere. Als je bijvoorbeeld een muzikant uit Gnawa kringen zou vragen om te komen spelen, of het nou een gitarist of een saxofonist is, wat zou hij dan doen? Dit: hij doet iets uit zijn hoofd. Hij heeft geen richtlijnen waaraan hij zich moet houden, tegenover het publiek. Hij doet iets uit zijn hoofd, op basis van hoe hij zich voelt. En hoe noemen we dat meestal? Dat noemen we spiritueel. Misschien verlangt het repertoire dat we vanavond spelen dat ik bepaalde woorden niet zing. Misschien zing ik vandaag gormoso, maar morgen tijdens het eerste deel van de avond het bekende Abdelkader en in het tweede deel dijlali. Dat is gebaseerd op de aard van de ingeving die je op het moment van je handelen of optreden ervaart. Dat vind je ook terug bij het soefisme.

.

Zijn er dan ook bepaalde zaken waarover niet gezongen mag of dient te worden? Of zijn er bepaalde voorwaarden waaraan een Gnawa optreden moet voldoen? Het zal vast niet bedoeld zijn als een avondje puur vermaak. Er is een bepaalde uitdrukking in dialect waarin men zegt: ‘We zingen niet met volkszangeressen.’

Er zijn inderdaad bepaalde regels. Als het een Gnawa avond is waarbij ook wierrook wordt gebrand, dan heeft geen enkele volkszanger of volkszangeres er ook maar iets mee te maken. Gnawa blijft Gnawa: de avond is in principe zo georganiseerd dat het een echte Gnawa avond wordt. Maar soms, zoals ik al eerder zei, zie je de invloed van bepaalde ontwikkelingen ook terug in de Gnawa. Tegenwoordig kan het voorkomen dat we worden gevraagd om op te treden tijdens galafeesten; dan bijvoorbeeld niet allen wij daar aanwezig, maar ook een aantal volkszangeressen. Dan treden zij als eerste op, en daarna wij, met alles er op en er aan. Alles verloopt dan goed, maar we maken dan geen gebruik van wierrook of iets dergelijks, en de vrouwen dragen geen hoofddoeken.

.

Dus als het doel religieus of spiritueel is, dan gelden er speciale regels; en als het doel wereldlijk vermaak is, idem dito?

In het eerste geval; ja. Maar in het laatste geval zijn er eigenlijk geen regels; alle deuren staan dan open.

.

Zijn er bepaalde gebruiken of rituelen die u in ere houdt, voordat u begint met een optreden? Is er in uw gezelschap bijvoorbeeld een bepaalde volgorde om het podium op te lopen? Of dat u als eerste bepaalde dingen doet, en daarna pas de andere muzikanten?

Wij geloven in Allah; verheven en geprezen is Hij. We beginnen alles altijd met bismillah; in de naam van Allah, en we vragen de zegening van onze ouders. We hopen dat God ons bijstaat. Maar uiteindelijk ligt onze lotsbestemming vast. Bij de voorbereidingen weet iedereen wat zijn taak is; en tegelijkertijd is iedereen op dat moment bezig met zijn innerlijk. We komen op, doen wat wij behoren te doen, en dat was het. Wat betreft de volgorde van dingen doen; daar zit zeker iets achter. Dat zijn zaken die vallen onder ons vakmanschap. Als ik opga, dan moet ik als eerste zingen; dan pas volgen zij mij.

.

Toen u zo’n jaar of zeven was, een jonge jongen nog, begon uw muzikale opleiding al bij diverse Gnawa meesters. Wat betekende die muziek voor u op die leeftijd?

De Gnawa was voor mij als een grote liefde. Bij ons in de buurt was een zawiya, en ik zag veel zwarte slaven. De man van mijn oma was eigenlijk mijn eerste Gnawa meester. Je kunt stellen dat ik ben opgegroeid in die zawiya, met de Gnawa in mijn oren; dat heeft mijn ogen er ook voor geopend. Mijn vader vond echter dat ik moest gaan studeren, terwijl ik me liever bezig wilde houden met de Gnawa. Zoals je ziet is het uiteindelijk toch Gnawa geworden!

.

U zag daar dus geen ander doel in dan die traditie voort te zetten?

Het bijdragen en voortzetten van de Gnawa was het enige waar mijn hart naar verlangde. God heeft me dit beroep gegeven; en ik heb het met beide handen aangepakt. Ik heb heel veel Gnawa’s gezien, zowel in het noorden als in het zuiden. De Gnawa traditie brengt je naar vele streken, slechts om het goed te leren. Je ontwikkelt je muzikaliteit namelijk bij verschillende Gnawa meesters; je ontvangt lessen van de ene meester na de ander. Dit is een bijzonder proces om mee te maken. Soms dacht ik wel eens dat het leren beheersen van Gnawa net zoiets is als in militaire dienst gaan! Vanaf mijn zevende tot nu, zo’n 48 à 49 jaar, woon ik zoals de Gnawa’s al heel lang doen; ik trek steeds rond. Maar deze traditie heeft mij, en anderen met mij, heel veel gebracht. We zijn bijvoorbeeld naar plaatsen afgereisd waar andere mensen niet zomaar zouden komen, en we komen op plaatsen waar alleen rijke lieden komen omdat zij naar Gnawa willen luisteren. Op die manier hebben we onze toekomst opgebouwd, God zij dank. Zo gaan we verder, en we zien wel waar we uit zullen komen.

.

Heeft uw grootvader in die hoedanigheid invloed op uw persoonlijke leven uitgeoefend?

Jazeker. God zij dank heb ik er geen spijt van, maar ik heb door hem geen onderwijs genoten. Door hem ben ik wel een rasvertegenwoordiger van de Gnawa traditie geworden. Mensen zeggen soms dat als God je hersenen heeft gegeven, terwijl je geen beroep uitoefent in het leven of in de gemeenschap waarin je leeft, je als mens je er toch bewust van kan zijn wat je dan wel doet -God zij dank. Maar ik zou altijd nog nieuwe dingen kunnen leren. Bepaalde zaken heb ik door mijn gebrek aan onderwijs misschien niet kunnen bereiken, en soms doet dat besef me ergens pijn; maar ik laat me er niet door uit het veld slaan. Ik ben wie ik ben.

.

U bent inmiddels een bekende gnawa maâlem, een Gnawa meester. Koestert u nog bepaalde wensen of dromen die u zou willen verwezenlijken binnen de kringen van de Gnawa muziek?

Laat ik zeggen dat ik werk, en mijn best doe, om mijn eigen stijl binnen de Gnawa traditie te creëren; om mijn eigen melodie te scheppen, en mijn eigen woorden te kiezen. God zij dank ben ik al bezig om dit ‘project’ te realiseren. Als God het wil, hoop ik hetzelfde te bereiken als die mensen die een wereldse macht hebben.

.

Wat zou de droom zijn van de man Hamid El Kasri, in plaats van de muzikant Hamid El Kasri?

Mijn persoonlijke droom en mijn wens is dat ik in dit leven goed mag werken; dat ik mag leven onder de beste omstandigheden; dat ik mezelf goed mag ontwikkelen. Maar bovenal dat ik goed mag leven, totdat ik dood ga.

.

.

OBA Live 12-05-2009

Zie deze link.

"In de vaste rubriek ‘De Islamitische canon’ deze keer het boek The Other Islam van Stephen Suleyman Schwartz.

De tot de islam bekeerde Daniëlle Dürst Britt zal uitleggen waarom iedereen dit boek zou moeten lezen."

.

The20other20islam